The Post-Referendum World: The View From Maastricht, Boston, and Suffolk (Part 3/3)

On Wednesday 6 July, Suffolk Business School and University Campus Suffolk welcomed our partners from Europe and the USA to our Ipswich Campus. Dr Stuart Dixon, Academic Coordinator Global MBA Programs at the Maastricht School of Management, and Mike Barretti, International Marketing at Suffolk University, Boston US, joined our very own Dr Tom Vine, Course Leader EMBA and MBA, to deliver an Executive MBA Mini-Masterclass on:  The Post-Referendum World: The View From Boston, Maastricht and Suffolk.

2016-07-06 15.38.16
From left to right: Mike Barretti (Boston), Dr Stuart Dixon (Maastricht), Dr Tom Vine (Suffolk) and Stuart Bannerman (Director of International, UCS).

In this, the third in a three part blog series, Dr Tom Vine discusses the reaction of ‘Brexit’ in Suffolk and UCS:

Offering a view of Suffolk on the EU Referendum is tricky. There is a lot of conjecture in understanding the results. Having worked in psephology (the study of elections and electoral behaviour), I know that people rarely vote in accordance with linear logic. There is a perceived disconnect in voting trends – areas of the UK that recieve a high level of EU funding mostly voted ‘Leave.’

Just four days after the EU Referendum, Alvin Toffler, author of Future Shock, died. This best selling book explored changed and the ramifications of change, and argued that change itself was not the problem – it was the rate of change that caused issues for the general population. In politics, change can happen at a rapid pace, and many voters in the EU referendum may have been looking for some continuity. The electoral process is a way for the population to slow things down.

The Referendum also highlighted the notion of identity, and it was explored a great deal in the media. When it was formed, and throughout its history, the EU has been reluctant to engineer a sense of collective identity because it felt such a thing would be inauthentic. People find it easier to form identities on a more local level – in particular on the basis of ‘what you are not.’ For the UK, people can say they are ‘not French’ or ‘not Portuguese.’ There is, however, no corresponding ‘other’ for the EU, and therefore it is difficult to tap into a shared belonging for it.

In terms of Suffolk, I think it is safe to say that staff and students of UCS are left with a feeling of deflation. UK Higher Education institutions have, on average, around 20% non-British EU staff and students, and the ambiguity of what will happen now is a real challenge for our community. International collaborations, research projects, and funding applications are already feeling the effects of Brexit. Within our own team here at UCS, members of the academic staff have had research projects pulled because of their involvement – the UK is too high risk to collaborate with. There is definitely a sense of needing to weather this storm over a considerable amount of time.

 

For more information on the Suffolk Business School MBA and Maastricht-Suffolk Executive MBA, email us at talkbusiness@ucs.ac.uk

The Executive MBA is a new programme for the University of Suffolk in partnership with the Maastricht School of Management (MSM). This is a part-time flexible, modular course designed for professionals with 8 weeks of teaching across two years shared between Maastricht and Suffolk with an option for one placement in Boston (US). At the end of 24 months graduates receive their EMBA from the prestigious Maastricht School of Management.

The next EMBA Mini Masterclass will be discussing Leadership in an Uncertain World and will be held on 1 August 2016 6pm to 7:30pm at the Waterfront Building Boardroom, University of Suffolk. All are welcome, and to register interest please do not hesitate to email Laura Messer: l.messer@ucs.ac.uk or call on 01473 338616.

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The Post-Referendum World: The View From Maastricht, Boston, and Suffolk (Part 2/3)

On Wednesday 6 July, Suffolk Business School and University Campus Suffolk welcomed our partners from Europe and the USA to our Ipswich Campus. Dr Stuart Dixon, Academic Coordinator Global MBA Programs at the Maastricht School of Management, and Mike Barretti, International Marketing at Suffolk University, Boston US, joined our very own Dr Tom Vine, Course Leader EMBA and MBA, to deliver an Executive MBA Mini-Masterclass on:  The Post-Referendum World: The View From Boston, Maastricht and Suffolk.

2016-07-06 15.38.16
From left to right: Mike Barretti (Boston), Dr Stuart Dixon (Maastricht), Dr Tom Vine (Suffolk), and Stuart Bannerman (Director of International, UCS).

In this, the second in a three part blog series, Mike Barretti discusses the reaction of ‘Brexit’ from point of view of Boston and the USA:

In the run up to the Referendum, it was a lead story on the big TV stations. When it actually happened, the markets reacted, as we know, and then a week later they basically seemed to return to normal. In that respect, American people stopped thinking about it. Obviously, businesses with heavy investments in the UK and Europe are concerned, but to most people there are other political issues that require attention.

You’ve seen in the news that our own Presidential race is picking up pace. In that, there are many similarities with the EU Referendum – the concern of control from a central place, racism, sovereignty, and control of borders and immigration. There’s a sense of ‘we want to run our own lives’, and not be dictated to by an unseen and unknowable power. In that, there is a level of empathy with the UK.

I think the fallout from ‘Brexit’ won’t be seen in the USA for some time. People who have retirement and savings accounts with companies that have investments in the UK might notice the difference… eventually.

For myself, I was surprised. I fully expected that the UK population would stay in the EU and see the benefits in that. But I can understand why the vote went the way it did. In America, we see jobs disappearing to illegal immigrants – but few people will acknowledge the fact that they are jobs that American’s don’t want to do themselves.

In the end, I believe you guys will work thins out. There is a special relationship between the UK and the USA, and that will continue. Our relationship might change, but I believe we will always support you.

For more information on the Suffolk Business School MBA and Maastricht-Suffolk Executive MBA, email us at talkbusiness@ucs.ac.uk

The Executive MBA is a new programme for the University of Suffolk in partnership with the Maastricht School of Management (MSM). This is a part-time flexible, modular course designed for professionals with 8 weeks of teaching across two years shared between Maastricht and Suffolk with an option for one placement in Boston (US). At the end of 24 months graduates receive their EMBA from the prestigious Maastricht School of Management.

The next EMBA Mini Masterclass will be discussing Leadership in an Uncertain World and will be held on 1 August 2016 6pm to 7:30pm at the Waterfront Building Boardroom, University of Suffolk. All are welcome, and to register interest please do not hesitate to email Laura Messer: l.messer@ucs.ac.uk or call on 01473 338616.

The Post-Referendum World: The View From Maastricht, Boston, and Suffolk (Part 1/3)

On Wednesday 6 July, Suffolk Business School and University Campus Suffolk welcomed our partners from Europe and the USA to our Ipswich Campus. Dr Stuart Dixon, Academic Coordinator Global MBA Programs at the Maastricht School of Management, and Mike Barretti, International Marketing at Suffolk University, Boston US, joined our very own Dr Tom Vine, Course Leader EMBA and MBA, to deliver an Executive MBA Mini-Masterclass on:  The Post-Referendum World: The View From Boston, Maastricht and Suffolk.

2016-07-06 15.38.16
From left to right: Mike Barretti (Boston), Dr Stuart Dixon (Maastricht), Dr Tom Vine (Suffolk), and Stuart Bannerman (Director of International, UCS)

In this, the first in a three part blog series, Dr Stuart Dixon explains the reaction of ‘Brexit’ from point of view of Maastricht and the Netherlands:

On the days running up to the Referendum, and every day since, it has been on the news, with predictions and consequences. The people of the Netherlands are both concerned and very interested, with many asking ‘how has this happened?’

One of the major questions has been why a referendum was called on such a complex issue – voting to leave the EU should not be such a black and white decision, and calling a Referendum does not allow you to negotiate. In business, if you are looking to make a deal, you do not go for all or nothing. There is a period of consultation, of give and take.

In the Netherlands, there is a general sense of shock that just 2% of the population have forced a decision for everyone. There is an assumption for such big issues that there should be a two-thirds majority vote before it goes to the House.

The Netherlands is a trading nation, with a large percentage of its GDP tied up in imports and exports, and the Referendum has raised concerns as the UK is a big trading partner. The Dutch, British, and Scandinavians work together a lot, especially within politics. The Dutch, however, are a small entity within the EU, and have not led many conversations, instead supporting the UK. So what happens next for us? How do we start political discussions, and who will we now ally with?

The ‘Brexit’ could be a positive force for the Netherlands – business is conducted in English, and we could be a viable alternative for foreign investment. We have good infrastructure and communication links.

But overall, there is a general feeling of instability in Europe as a whole. More than anything, ‘Brexit’ has demonstrated the difficulties and complexities involved in allowing something as important as the ‘in/out’ debate for the EU go to a Referendum – it’s very dangerous. For now, we need to work towards economic and political stability, not just for the Netherlands of the UK, but for the whole of Europe.

For more information on the Suffolk Business School MBA and Maastricht-Suffolk Executive MBA, email us at talkbusiness@ucs.ac.uk

The Executive MBA is a new programme for the University of Suffolk in partnership with the Maastricht School of Management (MSM). This is a part-time flexible, modular course designed for professionals with 8 weeks of teaching across two years shared between Maastricht and Suffolk with an option for one placement in Boston (US). At the end of 24 months graduates receive their EMBA from the prestigious Maastricht School of Management.

The next EMBA Mini Masterclass will be discussing Leadership in an Uncertain World and will be held on 1 August 2016 6pm to 7:30pm at the Waterfront Building Boardroom, University of Suffolk. All are welcome, and to register interest please do not hesitate to email Laura Messer: l.messer@ucs.ac.uk or call on 01473 338616.