#SBSStudents: Learning in Context (and in the sun!)

Students from the Suffolk Business School at the University of Suffolk have recently returned from a cultural tourism field trip to southern Spain.

The students studying Event and Tourism Management and Business Management visited Seville, Cordoba and Cadiz.

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Suffolk Business School students and staff in Seville. Photo (C) Suffolk Business School

Gintare Liutkeviciute, first year Event and Tourism student said “It has been an amazing trip, with the best people! I enjoyed every minute of it and it was great to use our Spanish language knowledge. I was impressed with the discipline and dedication of Spanish students at the Dance Concervatorio, it definitely taught me how important is to focus on my goals and to be committed no matter how hard it can get. Overall, this trip was absolutely amazing, can somebody turn back time por favor?”

Laura Locke, Course Leader for BA (Hons) Event and Tourism Management  who accompanied the students said “We visited museums and galleries, marvelled at the combination of Moslem, Jewish and Catholic heritage architecture displayed in the Mesquita in Cordoba, explored the Plaza de Espana in Seville where Game of Thrones and Star Wars was filmed and questioned the tour guide in Cadiz about the opportunities for developing destinations, thus extending the students’ learning from their year one and two modules.”

“There were many highlights of the tour; students were unanimous that the visit to the Conservatoire for Spanish dance in Seville was enlightening, inspiring, and inspirational.”

Accompanying Laura on the tour was Lecturer Gloria Picton. With a background in banking, Gloria teaches the Language and Culture for Business module so the students were able to put their Spanish to the test.

Fellow student Alioune Sylla said “I would recommend that every university should offer their students this opportunity. We really have been blessed to experience it. This trip offers students to get to know each other at different levels, to connect and also build friendships…we were able to practice what we have been studying in Spanish seminars for the past few weeks.”

 

Creating #SBSCareerReady Graduates

By David Collins, Suffolk Business School

Those who read this blog (and I would like to thank both of you most sincerely) and the more observant among our twitter followers may have noticed that we have changed our ‘hashtag’. We no longer speak of our graduates as being ‘business ready’. Instead we have chosen to highlight their career readiness. I think it might be useful to elaborate upon this development…

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In common with all other British universities the University of Suffolk is expected to demonstrate a commitment to ‘employability’. Our previous reference to the preparation of ‘business ready’ graduates was an attempt to signal our commitment to this agenda. Yet while the term was not inaccurate as a statement of practice and intent, it was nonetheless potentially misleading. You see, while our students and graduates are plainly employable – many have held important roles prior to enrolment and a significant number continue to hold down responsible jobs even while studying full-time – they do not just work for ‘business organizations’. Hospitals, schools, charities and councils (to name just a few (non)business organizations) all build and depend upon the skills that our graduates have developed and can demonstrate. So to suggest that we – as Suffolk Business School – produce just ‘business ready’ graduates is to under-estimate our reach and our broader contribution to society. Our new ‘career-ready’ graduate ‘hashtag’ (#SBSCareerReady) therefore alters our promise to our students and to the families and communities that, in a number of important ways, nurture and depend upon them.

So what does being #SBSCareerReady signal? It’s simple really. We are changing what we do. We will build upon our existing good practices to provide the practical and intellectual challenges that will allow you to be, on graduation, not just employable but ready to embark upon a career.

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And why does this matter? It matters because careers are transformational. Our career-ready graduates will not just possess a degree certificate. They will hold, instead, the golden ticket to an enriching, life-long and life-changing project.

What will this life-changing project entail? Good question. I fully intend to return to this in a later post. Until then I will simply conclude with the suggestion that this is not something I can do to you. No, being career-ready is a process that we will achieve only if we work together!

To find out more about becoming Career Ready with the Suffolk Business School, see our list of courses here.

#SBSStudents: Suffolk Business School Helping to Improve Financial Literacy

By Dr Atul K. Shah

Finance today is a complex arena, and sadly there have been far too many experiences of fraud and deception such that a majority of ordinary people are fearful and have lost trust in experts like bankers, lawyers and accountants. Here at the Suffolk Business School, we have been very concerned about the ethics of finance education, and have always tried to help our student experience by organising field trips and inviting visiting speakers. Here are some examples:

We took the initiative to contact Ipswich Citizens Advice Bureau to help our students to understand the kinds of finance challenges people faced, and how the CAB tries to advise and support. We were welcomed by their Deputy Manager, Nelleke van Helfteren. They ran a workshop for the students explaining the services they provide, how they help people with a range of problems, debt being the most common, and she also ran some interactive quizzes for them. The whole visit was a huge eye-opener, as modern finance textbooks used in business schools say nothing about personal finance and the huge problems of financial fraud and financial illiteracy. By default, they prove that the lives of the ordinary and the marginal are irrelevant for the study of ‘high finance’ – the highly technical, complex and fraudulent variety which sadly prevails today.

Two of our students, Kameliya Yankov and Teodor Georgiev were so impressed that they have applied to be volunteers at the CAB. We are following up the visit by setting a class assignment for them to reflect on the experience and what they learnt from it.

Here is what Nelleke van Helfteren, Deputy Manager of the Ipswich CAB said to me:

“It was such a delight to meet your students and I found it very stimulating to look at our service through the eyes of Finance and Accounting students and to paint a picture of what money means to many of our clients. It is so important for people working in the financial sector to understand how our personal finances feed into so many aspects of our lives – health, relationships, housing, employment to name but a few. The evidence that we gather in the course of our advice work demonstrates this very clearly.

It would be great to meet you and talk about how we can work together in the future to ensure your students at many levels are well-educated in the impact of finance on individuals going about their everyday lives.”

We were very impressed by the service the Ipswich CAB provides free of charge, and the quality of their training and management. They also seemed very cost-efficient, proving that businesses are not the only efficient organisations on the planet – in fact charities can be even more efficient. Above all, we found their ‘holistic’ approach, which tries to engage with the whole person, very synonymous with our approach to finance education here. Like them, we too respect the students as whole beings.